# Configuration

# Introduction

In the following documentation, we will discuss how to configure a Laravel Spark installation when using the Stripe payment provider. All of Spark's configuration options are housed in your application's config/spark.php configuration file.

# Stripe Configuration

Of course, to use Stripe as a payment provider for your Laravel Spark application you must have an active Stripe account.

# Environment Variables

Next, you should configure the application environment variables that will be needed by Spark in order to access your Stripe account. These variables should be placed in your application's .env environment file.

Of course, you should adjust the variable's values to correspond to your own Stripe account's credentials. Your Stripe API credentials and public key are available in your Stripe account dashboard:

CASHIER_CURRENCY=USD
CASHIER_CURRENCY_LOCALE=en
STRIPE_KEY=pk_test_example
STRIPE_SECRET=sk_test_example
STRIPE_WEBHOOK_SECRET=sk_test_example

Configuring Locales

In order to use locales other than en, ensure the ext-intl PHP extension is installed and configured on your server.

# Stripe Webhooks

In addition, your Spark powered application will need to receive webhooks from Stripe in order to keep your application's billing and subscription data in sync with Stripe's. Within your Stripe dashboard's webhook management panel, you should configure Stripe to send webhook alerts to your application's /spark/webhook URI. You should enable webhook alerts for the following events:

  • customer.deleted
  • customer.subscription.created
  • customer.subscription.deleted
  • customer.subscription.updated
  • customer.updated
  • invoice.payment_action_required
  • invoice.payment_succeeded

# Webhooks & Local Development

For Stripe to be able to send your application webhooks during local development, you will need to expose your application via a site sharing service such as Ngrok or Expose. If you are developing your application locally using Laravel Sail, you may use Sail's site sharing command.

# Configuring Billables

Spark allows you to define the types of billable models that your application will be managing. Most commonly, applications bill individual users for monthly and yearly subscription plans. However, your application may choose to bill some other type of model, such as a team, organization, band, etc.

You may define your billable models within the billables array of your application's spark configuration file. By default, this array contains an entry for the App\Models\User model.

Before continuing, you should ensure that the model class that corresponds to your billable model is using the Spark\Billable trait and that it casts the trial_ends_at attribute to datetime:

<?php

namespace App\Models;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Factories\HasFactory;
use Illuminate\Foundation\Auth\User as Authenticatable;
use Illuminate\Notifications\Notifiable;
use Spark\Billable;

class User extends Authenticatable
{
    use Billable, HasFactory, Notifiable;

    protected $casts = [
        'trial_ends_at' => 'datetime',
    ];

}

# Billable Slugs

As you may have noticed, each entry in the billables configuration array is keyed by a "slug" that is a shortened form of the billable model class. This slug can be used when accessing the Spark customer billing portal, such as https://example.com/billing/user or https://example.com/billing/team.

# Billable Resolution

When you installed Laravel Spark, an App\Providers\SparkServiceProvider class was created for you. Within this service provider, you will find a callback that is used by Spark to resolve the billable model instance when accessing the Spark billing portal. By default, this callback simply returns the currently authenticated user, which is the desired behavior for most applications using Laravel Spark:

use App\Models\User;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use Spark\Spark;

Spark::billable(User::class)->resolve(function (Request $request) {
    return $request->user();
});

However, if your application is not billing individual users, you may need to adjust this callback. For example, if your application offers team billing instead of user billing, you might customize the callback like so:

use App\Models\Team;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use Spark\Spark;

Spark::billable(Team::class)->resolve(function (Request $request) {
    return $request->user()->currentTeam;
});

# Billable Authorization

Next, let's examine the authorization callbacks that Spark will use to determine if the currently authenticated user of your application is authorized to view the billing portal for a particular billable model.

When you installed Laravel Spark, an App\Providers\SparkServiceProvider class was created for you. Within this service provider, you will find the authorization callback definition used to determine if a given user is authorized to view the billing portal for the App\Models\User billable class. Of course, if your application is not billing users, you should update the billable class and authorization callback logic to fit your application's needs. By default, Spark will simply verify that the currently authenticated user can only manage its own billing settings:

use App\Models\User;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use Spark\Spark;

Spark::billable(User::class)->authorize(function (User $billable, Request $request) {
    return $request->user() &&
           $request->user()->id == $billable->id;
});

If the authorization callback returns true, the currently authenticated user will be authorized to view the billing portal and manage the billing settings for the given $billable model. If the callback returns false, the request to access the billing portal will be denied.

You are free to customize the authorize callback based on your own application's needs. For example, if your application bills teams instead of individual users, you might update the callback like so:

use App\Models\Team;
use Illuminate\Http\Request;
use Spark\Spark;

Spark::billable(Team::class)->authorize(function (Team $billable, Request $request) {
    return $request->user() &&
           $request->user()->ownsTeam($billable);
});

# Defining Subscription Plans

As we previously discussed, Spark allows you to define the types of billable models that your application will be managing. These billable models are defined within the billables array of your application's config/spark.php configuration file:

Each billable configuration within the billables array contains a plans array. Within this array you may configure each of the billing plans offered by your application to that particular billable type. The monthly_id and yearly_id identifiers should correspond to the price / plan identifiers configured within your Stripe account dashboard:

use App\Models\User;

'billables' => [
    'user' => [
        'model' => User::class,
        'trial_days' => 5,
        'plans' => [
            [
                'name' => 'Standard',
                'short_description' => 'This is a short, human friendly description of the plan.',
                'monthly_id' => 'price_id',
                'yearly_id' => 'price_id',
                'features' => [
                    'Feature 1',
                    'Feature 2',
                    'Feature 3',
                ],
            ],
        ],
    ],
]

If your subscription plan only offers a monthly billing cycle, you may omit the yearly_id identifier from your plan configuration. Likewise, if your plan only offers a yearly billing cycle, you may omit the monthly_id identifier.

In addition, you are free to supply a short description of the plan and a list of features relevant to the plan. This information will be displayed in the Spark billing portal.

# Accessing The Billing Portal

Once you have configured your Spark installation, you may access your application's billing portal at the /billing URI. So, if your application is being served on localhost, you may access your application's billing portal at http://localhost/billing.

Of course, you may link to the billing portal from your application's dashboard however you see fit:

<a href="/billing">
    Manage Subscription
</a>

Many applications display billing terms and conditions during checkout. Spark allows you to easily do the same within your application's billing portal. To get started, add a terms_url configuration value in your application's config/spark.php configuration file:

'terms_url' => '/terms'

Once added, Spark will display a link pointing to /terms in the billing portal.